Montana Women Vote works to register and engage women at all levels of our democracy, including by casting their vote at the ballot box.

Montana Women Vote is a non-profit, non-partisan organization that doesn’t support or endorse political candidates. This guide provides the tools you need to make informed decisions about candidates, ballot measures, and other public policy proposals.

Election Day is Tuesday, November 6th! Polls are Open from 7 AM until 8 PM.

  • GET MORE INFO:  You can check to see if you are registered, where you are registered, view a sample ballot, and track your absentee ballot at the Secretary of State’s website: http://app.mt.gov/voterinfo or by calling your county elections office.
  • VOTE ABSENTEE:  If you have not signed up for an absentee ballot, but would like to vote early, you can do so in person at your county elections office.
    • Please Note:  If you are voting absentee, remember that you need to vote the ballot that was mailed to you and that you will not be able to vote at the polls unless you bring your absentee ballot with you. If you lose your absentee ballot, you can get a replacement ballot at your county elections office or you can vote provisionally at your local polling place on Election Day.
  • VOTE EARLY:  If you have not signed up for an absentee ballot, but would like to vote early, you can do so in-person at your county elections office. When you sign up for an absentee ballot between October 10th and November 5th at noon, you can register and vote at the same time.
    • Please note:  Some offices use an alternative location to do late and same-day voter registration and you should call your county elections office to double check the location.

Frequently Asked Questions about VOTING

CAN SOMEONE HELP ME WHEN I GO TO VOTE?
Yes, you can bring a friend, relative, teacher, or parent, and can bring in notes, a voter guide, etc. You just can’t bring an employer. Don’t forget, you are allowed to bring your kids to the polls!

DO I NEED MY VOTER REGISTRATION CARD IN ORDER TO VOTE?
No. However, you do need a form of ID and your voter registration card is one form of ID that you can use. Other IDs that you can use include any current photo ID that shows your name (valid driver’s license, school ID, state ID, or tribal ID) or a current utility bill, bank statement, paycheck, government check or another government document that shows your name and current address.

DO I HAVE TO VOTE FOR EVERY ITEM ON THE BALLOT?
No. You can choose not to vote for a candidate position or an initiative. Your ballot will still be valid even if you leave an item blank.

HOW DO I FIND OUT WHERE TO GO TO VOTE OR WHAT PRECINCT, DISTRICTS AND WARDS I AM VOTING FOR?
That information is on your voter registration card. If you do not have your card, you can call your county elections office for that information or check out the Secretary of State’s My Voter Page: https://app.mt.gov/voterinfo/.

Important Dates

OCTOBER 9TH
Close of regular voter registration. Absentee ballots are mailed October 12th.

OCTOBER 10TH
Same-day voter registration opens; you must go to your county elections office to vote.

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5TH AT NOON
Deadline to apply for an absentee ballot for the general election; you must go to your county elections office to apply.

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5TH FROM NOON – 5 PM
Your county elections office is closed in preparation for Election Day.

NOVEMBER 6TH: GENERAL ELECTION DAY!
Most polls are open from 7am-8pm. If you have been issued an absentee ballot and not mailed it back yet, you will need to hand-deliver it to your county elections office or to any polling location.

2018 Ballot Measures

Initiative 185 for a Healthy Montana

Montana Women Vote SUPPORTS I-185. Vote YES on the Healthy Montana Initiative!

I-185 saves Medicaid as we know it in the state of Montana. It increases the tobacco tax and uses the new revenue to fund essential health services. We know how important it is to save Medicaid for 100,000 Montanans, but I-185 does more than that. I-185 would fund programs that prevent kids from smoking and help current smokers quit. It funds long-term care services that help seniors and people with disabilities live independently and remain in their homes, and it provides funding for prescription drug coverage for low-income seniors.

Tobacco-related illness costs the State of Montana $440 million a year and it is past time that Big Tobacco pays for the deadly consequences of its products. I-185 pays for itself, will save the state money, and is a lifeline to rural hospitals and clinics. One hundred thousand Montanans are counting on us to pass I-185 so they can keep their Medicaid coverage.

Click here to view I-185 Endorsements 

Legislative Referendum 128 (The 6-Mill Levy)

Montana Women Vote SUPPORTS LR-128. Vote YES on the 6-Mill Levy!

LR-128 asks Montana voters to continue the existing 6-mill levy to support Montana’s public colleges and universities. The 6-mill levy is not a new tax, but a continued property tax levied on real estate and personal property that has been in place since 1948. The 6-Mill has received voter support every decade for the last 70 years. The levy provides support, maintenance, and improvement of Montana universities and colleges. The revenue goes directly to Montana’s public colleges and universities through Montana’s Board of Regents.

We need to continue to support our Montana University System. Public education is the cornerstone of our democracy and one of the best drivers of our economy and future workforce. Current and future public university students are counting on us to vote yes on LR-128!

Click here to view LR-128 Endorsements 

Legislative Referendum 129, Prohibition on ballot collection

Montana Women Vote OPPOSES LR-129. Vote NO on LR-129!

LR-129 would make it illegal for a person to pick up another person’s ballot and deliver it to the proper voting location. Violating the measure would be punishable by a fine of $500 for each ballot collected. The measure would become effective on the day it is approved by voters. There are some exceptions where people can turn in another person’s ballot – an election judge, postal worker, family or household member, caregiver, or someone known to the individual. Except for election judges and postal workers, people with special exceptions can turn in no more than 6 ballots and they sign a registry when they deliver the ballot. Our voting system works well and we don’t need to make changes that make it harder for individuals to cast their ballot. The administrative burden for county election offices is significant which is why the Montana Association of Clerks and Recorders opposed this measure. Voting is a right and we should be working on making it easier to cast a ballot, not more difficult. Vote no on LR-129.

Initiative 186

Montana Women Vote does not have an official position on I-186.

I-186 would require the Montana Department of Environmental Quality to deny permits for any new hard rock mines if the mine’s reclamation plan does not “contain measures sufficient to prevent the pollution of water without the need for perpetual treatment.” In mining, reclamation plans are plans to rehabilitate and restore land that has been used for mining.
If approved, the measure would become effective immediately and mean hard rock mining companies must show they can prevent water pollution without having to perpetually treat affected water.

Supporters of I-186 include:
The Park County Environmental Council, Trout Unlimited, Our Revolution, MontPIRG, Montana Environmental Information Center

Opponents of I-186 include:
Montana Mining Association, Sandfire America, Montana Resources LLP, Golden Sunlight Mines, Inc.

2018 STATEWIDE RACES

US Senator

Represents Montana in the US Senate in Washington, D.C.

US Representative

Represents Montana in the US House of Representatives in Washington, D.C.

Montana Supreme Court Justices 

The Montana Supreme Court is the highest court in the state, with one Chief Justice and six Justices. Decisions made by the Court affect Montana law.

  • Seat 2: Ingrid Gustafson, Incumbent & Unopposed
  • Seat 4: Beth Baker, Incumbent & Unopposed

Public Service Commissioners 

Regulate utilities in Montana. The state is divided into five PSC districts.