US Senate

Question: Will you vote to create and maintain a robust social safety net so those most in need don’t fall through the cracks?
  • Steve Bullock (D): Yes
    • To create a strong economy that works fairly for everyone, we must support and sustain the programs that help working families when they fall on hard times. Investments in initiatives like SNAP, Medicaid, and home energy assistance have been essential to keeping families out of poverty.
  • Steve Daines (R): Did Not Respond
Question: As we continue to grapple with COVID-19 and its aftermath, will you vote to invest in public health and support for low-income families and communities?
  • Steve Bullock (D): Yes
    • This pandemic has shown us how important long-term, sustained investment in public health is for preventing and responding to outbreaks of communicable diseases. Local, state, and federal public health workers are vital for protecting the physical and economic well-being of our communities. As Governor, I have worked to get assistance to hard-working Montanans, including small business owners, as they have felt the impacts of the COVID-19 outbreak. In the Senate, I will keep working to make sure they have the resources they need to recover from this pandemic even stronger than before.
  • Steve Daines (R): Did Not Respond
Question: All people deserve access to affordable, quality health care, including through programs such as Medicare, Medicaid, IHS, and the Affordable Care Act.
  • Steve Bullock (D): Agree
    • Access to quality healthcare should never depend on the size of your paycheck. Medicare, Medicaid, the IHS, and the ACA have been crucial in creating more equal access to healthcare, and in the Senate, I will work to build on the progress of these critical initiatives and ensure that every Montanan can afford healthcare coverage.
  • Steve Daines (R): Did Not Respond

US House

Question: Will you vote to create and maintain a robust social safety net so those most in need don’t fall through the cracks?
  • Matt Rosendale (R): Did Not Respond
  • Kathleen Williams (D): Yes
Question: As we continue to grapple with COVID-19 and its aftermath, will you vote to invest in public health and support for low-income families and communities?
  • Matt Rosendale (R): Did Not Respond
  • Kathleen Williams (D): Yes
Question: All people deserve access to affordable, quality health care, including through programs such as Medicare, Medicaid, IHS, and the Affordable Care Act.
  • Matt Rosendale (R): Did Not Respond
  • Kathleen Williams (D): Agree
    • Thanks for the opportunity to address the interests of Montana Women Vote. I share your priorities and have advocated for all in this campaign, last campaign, and in the Legislature. I look forward to working with Montana Women Vote as your next Congresswoman.

Governor

Question: In order to fully invest in communities and infrastructure, Montana should raise revenue by closing tax loopholes and ensuring that everyone is paying their fair share.
  • Lyman Bishop (L): Agree
  • Mike Cooney (D): Agree
    • Investing in Montana communities and infrastructure is a critical way for the legislature and the state to help our economy grow and support good-paying jobs. I believe the wealthiest individuals in Montana should pay their fair share and have proposed an increased income tax on individuals making $500,000 or more. 
  • Greg Gianforte (R): Did Not Respond
Question: As Governor, would you continue Montana’s crucial Medicaid expansion, without barriers to access such as work requirements or increasing premiums?
  • Lyman Bishop (L): Yes
  • Mike Cooney (D): Yes
    • As Governor Bullock’s Lt. Governor I fought to reauthorize Medicaid expansion, which provides health care to 1 in 10 Montanans and has served as a lifeline for our rural hospitals. As governor I will protect the program from any attacks, including unconstitutional work requirements.
  • Greg Gianforte (R): Did Not Respond
Question: As Governor, would you sign any bills restricting a woman’s ability to make her own healthcare decisions in consultation with her doctor?
  • Lyman Bishop (L): No
  • Mike Cooney (D): No
    • I support a woman’s right to make private medical decisions and access to reproductive healthcare. As governor I will veto any bill that attacks or restricts a woman’s right to choose.
  • Greg Gianforte (R): Did Not Respond

Secretary of State

Question: Do you agree or disagree with the implementation and expansion of satellite voting offices in reservation counties?
  • Bryce Bennett (D): Agree
    • The establishment of satellite voting locations on our tribal reservations was an important step towards ensuring every voice is heard and every vote is counted in our democracy – but we can’t stop there. We must pass legislation to ensure they are permanent and available at multiple locations on each reservation. We should build a partnership between the Secretary of State/State of Montana and these communities to provide funding to ensure they offices are open full time throughout the early voting period, just like county election offices. Working with tribal leadership and community members will be important throughout all of these steps to ensure that tribes are leading when it comes to how they offices are placed, who works at them, and how they can best help the voters in their area. We must also make sure these locations have the resources they need to remain strong, secure, and accessible in the face of COVID-19. Finding opportunities to make these offices mobile, provide drive through options, and protect the health of voters and poll workers must be paramount.
  • Christi Jacobsen (R): Did Not Respond
Question: Do you support or oppose the Ballot Interference Prevention Act (BIPA)?
  • Bryce Bennett (D): Oppose
    • The “Ballot Interference Prevention Act” is and always has been a clear cut effort to but barriers between Montanans and their constitutional right to vote. I voted against this voter suppression bill when it was proposed in the legislature and voted against it on the ballot. In Montana we help our neighbors. It’s something we take pride in. This law directly attacked the ability of friends and neighbors to help each other cast a ballot and make their voice heard in our democracy. Many times I’ve dropped off ballots for folks because they know I’m heading that direction. I have never asked who they are voting for, I’m just excited to see more people participating. I know I’m not the only Montanan who has done that for others. The courts have rightfully struck this law down because it is a solution in search of a non-existent problem. We should be empowering voters, not attacking their rights.
  • Christi Jacobsen (R): Did Not Respond

State Auditor

Question: As Auditor, will you pursue legislation to improve state oversight of insurance rates and administrative costs, in order to hold insurance companies accountable to those who buy their services?  
  • Troy Downing (R): Did Not Respond
  • Shane A. Morigeau (D):Yes
    • The State Auditor’s office is a consumer protection agency. I take this responsibility extremely seriously — Montanans deserve quality, affordable insurance coverage which adequately covers what it purports to cover. I served in the MT Legislature for two terms, both in leadership, and am the only candidate to have drafted and passed legislation as a legislator. I will use my background and experience to support legislation that strengthens the Auditor’s office and allows it to fully exercise its consumer protection role to hold insurance companies accountable to Montanans. Improving state oversight is vital to making sure Montanans are being treated fairly by big insurance companies.
  • Roger Roots (L): Did Not Respond
Question: Do you support or oppose refusal clauses (ie. religious exemptions) that allow employers or businesses to refuse to provide birth control and other preventative health care services to employees/patients?
  • Troy Downing (R): Did Not Respond
  • Shane A. Morigeau (D): Oppose
    • Montanans deserve quality, affordable health insurance coverage, and nothing should get in the way of Montanans accessing needed medical care. By Montana law, insurance coverage cannot differ based on gender or marital status, and as Auditor, I will make sure that insurance companies follow the law. I see this office as a big opportunity to improve and expand affordable healthcare coverage across Montana, including for women, LGBTQI+ Montanans, in Indian Country,  and in our rural communities. This coverage must include birth control and other vital preventative health care services. This office plays the crucial role of overseeing health insurance in Montana, and can improve transparency and lead educational programs to make sure Montanans are informed of their rights as an insured person. I will lead strong efforts on all those fronts, so that Montanans can access the care that they need.
  • Roger Roots (L): Did Not Respond

Attorney General

Question: Racial and ethnic minorities, especially Native Americans, are disproportionately represented in Montana’s prisons and jails. Do you support or oppose legislative efforts to stop racial profiling by the police and the courts?
  • Raph Graybill (D): Support
    • As Attorney General, I’ll be an independent watchdog for our rights and do everything in my power to uphold the guarantee of equal protection in our judicial system. I oppose racial discrimination in all forms. The Montana Constitution guarantees the right to be free from discrimination based on race, political status, or ethnic background. It also guarantees the right to individual dignity. I’m committed to defending those rights for all Montanans on day one. I am the only candidate for Attorney General who has gone to the United States Supreme Court to defend the Montana Constitution.
  • Austin Knudsen (R): Did Not Respond
Question: As Attorney General, would you support alternative approaches to our criminal justice system that decrease incarceration, including but not limited to investment in mental health care and drug treatment?
  • Raph Graybill (D): Yes
    • We can’t prosecute our way out of the crisis of mental health and addiction in Montana. Our justice system needs to place equal emphasis on enforcement, treatment, and prevention. On the enforcement side, I fully support law enforcement efforts – especially those aimed at getting justice for children who are senselessly victimized by drug trafficking crimes. On the treatment and prevention side, it is crucial that we defend Montana’s expanded Medicaid program, which makes mental health and treatment services available to tens of thousands of Montanans. My opponent says he decided to run for Attorney General to eliminate Montana’s Medicaid expansion and the Affordable Care Act, and he led the effort against Montana’s healthcare as a legislator. That would be a disaster for public safety, especially in the middle of a pandemic. I’ll defend it, to keep Montana safe, healthy, and productive.
  • Austin Knudsen (R): Did Not Respond

Superintendent of Public Instruction

Question: As Superintendent, would you support legislative efforts to fully fund Indian Education for All?  
  • Elsie Arntzen (R): Yes
    • Yes, definitely.  My mother was born and raised on the Crow reservation and my grandparents were adopted into the Crow Tribe. Understanding and being proud of cultural heritage has always been a part of my Montana upbringing. As a legislator of 12 years and currently in my role as State Superintendent, I have supported maintaining indigenous languages with funding and policies that help maintain the links from our past to our future. I created a Tribal Education Caucus that has met every week of the past two legislative sessions.  Indian Education For All and Achievement is part of my overall Montana general fund budget. I brought in more qualified experts to ensure all Montana students learn about our rich tribal history, while supporting the success for our Native American students wherever they learn.  After almost 30 years, I renewed our Social Studies standards that embrace Indian education throughout all of our grades, not just benchmarks in three grades. And as we promote the mental health of our most at-risk students, I am proud of the efforts we’ve undertaken to increase cultural awareness while addressing unique challenges. All Montana students deserve a bright future and Indian Education for All helps provide a pathway to success for our students statewide. 
  • Kevin Leatherbarrow (L): No
    • The laws are very clear that cover the funding for Native American’s to meet their educational needs. Example, Johnson-O’Malley Act (JOM) of 1934, the Educational Agencies Financial Aid Act of 1950, and the School Facilities Construction Act of 1958. The Educational Agencies Financial Aid Act, or Public Law 81-874, provides funding to school districts that have large blocks of tax-exempt federal land within their boundaries. Finally, in 1994, Congress reauthorized The Indian Education Act of 1972 (IEA) as part of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA), a piece of civil rights legislation intended to protect economically and educationally disadvantaged children. I would encourage the Native population to be free of the arms of our State and Federal Government and reclaim their sovereignty. I would work hard with the Tribes of Montana to become more independent from the government and create an educational plan of their own, while upholding the laws written and in place to protect their rights as citizens.
  • Melissa Romano (D): Yes
    • All Montana students benefit from a well-funded Indian Education for All program. For native and non-native students alike, well-developed resources increase our children’s awareness and resiliency, and elevates their level of empathy and compassion for others. When we provide students opportunities to build a greater understanding about our state’s history, everyone benefits.
Question: Would you support or oppose any policy that would divert state education dollars from local public schools to private schools including religious schools?
  • Elsie Arntzen (R): Oppose
    • As a legislator, I worked to protect Montana’s Constitution as I championed legislation for the safety of children, family values, veterans, and taxpayers. This has continued during my time as State Superintendent.  I successfully secured full funding for schools during a time of pressure from the legislature to make budget cuts. I held the legislature to its statutory promise. My partnership with the legislature helped place education funding on the Governor’s desk at the beginning of each session to aid our schools as they began to prepare their individual budgets. In managing one of the largest state agencies and overall budgets, I have supported my expert staff with benefits and flexibilities not offered by others. The current Supreme Court ruling is clear. Discrimination will not be tolerated in Montana schools. Our Montana children’s well-being is crucial  and I support them wherever they learn.  As State Superintendent, I will continue to advocate for full funding of K-12 public education while strengthening our relationship with our private and homeschool partners and Montana parents. 
  • Kevin Leatherbarrow (L): Support
    • I advocate for a free-market education where parents, teachers, and students, not the government, should make their own choices on education. One-size-fits-all education, as mandated by the Department of Education, is holding America’s children back. Every child is different. Every community is different. Education should be chosen to fit the needs of each child and situation and teachers, parents, and students should be able to make their own choices. They are far better able to assess the needs of a particular child than an agency far off in Washington.
  • Melissa Romano (D): Oppose
    • Montana’s constitution clearly states every child has the right to access a quality public education. We cannot uphold this promise to our kids if we are sending public resources away from schools that support all children to for-profit private schools that most families cannot access. My opponent has been turning her back on our Constitution and Montana families for three decades. She has attended anti-public school rallies, supported efforts to divert public resources to private, for-profit schools, and worked alongside billionaire Betsy DeVos to defund public education opportunities for Montanans. We need a leader at the Office of Public Instruction who will be an unconditional advocate for all children, because every child deserves a quality public education no matter their circumstances.

Montana State Supreme Court

Question: Do you support increasing access to justice by continuing funding for the self-help law program in the Department of Justice budget? 
  • Mike Black: Yes
    • As a former attorney with Montana Legal Services Association and consistent with the positions taken by the Montana Supreme Court’s Access to Justice Commission, I believe it is important to support increasing access to justice in this manner.
  • Laurie McKinnon: Yes
    • The Self-Help Law Program has been an invaluable resource for improving access to justice and empowering people to navigate and take control of their cases. It is an excellent educational tool to learn about court services and process.  I support any program that increases access to justice and improves the delivery of court services.
  • Jim Shea: Did Not Respond
Question: Do you support increasing state funding for domestic and sexual violence intervention and prevention, including an increased focus on the issue of violence against Native women and other marginalized groups?
  • Mike Black: Yes
    • Again, as a former attorney with Montana Legal Services Association (as well as a former Assistant Attorney General with the Montana Department of Justice) and consistent with the positions taken by the Montana Supreme Court’s Access to Justice Commission, I believe it is important to support measures to combat domestic and sexual violence in this manner.
  • Laurie McKinnon: Yes
    • More needs to be done to educate people about violence against marginalized groups and the unique issues each face.  Education should include generating and collecting data to identify areas of need and how to best address those needs with existing resources and developing new resources that is data driven. 
  • Jim Shea: Did Not Respond
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